Contact Us

(770) 606-5700

Museum Hours

Every day 10 AM – 5 PM
Closed Major Holidays


Admission

Members: FREE
Adults: $15.95 + tax
Children (3 – 17): $11.95 + tax
Student with ID: $11.95 + tax
Active Military w/ ID: Free
(1/2 price admission for active
duty dependents with ID)
Seniors (65+): $13.95 + tax

Location

100 Tellus Drive
Cartersville, GA 30120
(770) 606-5700
I-75 Exit 293
Cartersville, GA
Colorful Cosmos at Tellus Science Museum

Special Virtual Exhibit Through June 1, 2018

8TH GRADE

Eighth grade girls from Cartersville Middle School participated in a digital astronomy project. These students learned how astronomers take pictures of the cosmos and what tools are necessary to take pictures of astronomical objects. They were trained by Tellus Astronomer David Dundee on how to control the MicroObservatory robotic telescopes over the internet and take their own images of the universe, and then how to process the images. Check out their images below:

Click any image to enlarge.

Crab Nebula by Trinity Atkins

Crab Nebula 2 by Trinity Atkins

Andromeda Galaxy by Trinity Atkins

Andromeda Galaxy 3 by Trinity Atkins

Andromeda Galaxy 2 by Trinity Atkins

Andromeda Galaxy by Lauren Cline

Andromeda Galaxy by Layne Condra

Lagoon Nebula by Kate Hacker

Andromeda Galaxy by Hayley Hovers

Moon by Olivia Kennedy

Cluster M15 by Isabel Schoomaker

9TH - 11TH GRADE

Select Cartersville High School girls in 9 -11th grade participated in a digital astronomy project. About half of these students participated 2 years ago in the Youth Colorful Cosmos project. Four of them participated in the National Youth Summit in Washington DC in February of 2017. The veteran students acted as mentors to the students who had never participated in the program before. The new students learned how astronomers take pictures of the cosmos, and what tools are necessary to take pictures of astronomical objects. In addition, students used NASA Astro-Pix website to obtain information about what they were imaging. They were guided by Tellus Astronomer David Dundee on how to control the MicroObservatory robotic telescopes over the internet and take their own images of the universe, and then how to process the images. Their projects are shared below with a short description of the image(s) they captured.

Click any image to enlarge.

Allison Archer

Messier 13 is a group of 300,000 stars discovered and documented by Charles Messier. Originally, Messier was solely interested in comets and after finding 15 of them, he noticed a cloud-like bunch within the Taurus constellation and looked more in depth. He started recording his discoveries in a separate journal, so he wouldn’t get them mixed up. Charles and his confrere researched for years and came upon many different clusters, galaxies, and astronomical objects. They named this the Messier catalog. Some of the messier objects include M1, the remainders of a crab nebula, and M31, the andromeda galaxy.

Margaret Gaines

Cygnus X-1 is a massive black hole in the last stage of a star life cycle. It is a very large blackhole that came from a giant star. This blackhole is located in the milky way galaxy. It pulls matter from a star near it. It is located 6,070 light years from earth. This blackhole emits x-rays and electromagnetic radiation. Its surrounding force field keeps the dangerous radiation from escaping. It is 14.8 times the mass of the sun. This size black hole could not have come from any star. This was once a huge star.  Cygnus X-1 was not originally thought to be a black hole, but later scientific observations deemed it a great black hole.

Anna Murphy

Trifid NebulaThe Trifid Nebula is also located in the Sagittarius constellation. This nebula was discovered by Charles Messier on June 5, 1764. Through a telescope, the nebula appears very bright and vivid. In 1997, some astronomers used the Hubble Space Telescope to investigate the Trifid Nebula. The images that they took gave them insight into what makes up the nebula. The Trifid Nebula is about 5000 light years from Earth.

 

Anna Murphy

Lagoon NebulaThis is the Lagoon Nebula. It is an interstellar cloud in the Sagittarius constellation. The nebula was discovered by Giovanni Hodierna circa 1654. It is estimated to be between 4,000 and 6,000 light years from Earth. The entire nebula is about 110 by 50 light years. In photos like this one, the Lagoon Nebula appears pink, but through a telescope or binoculars, the nebula looks gray.

 

Funded by the Smithsonian Institution’s Youth Access Grants program awarded by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Education and Access, Colorful Cosmos online special exhibit will be viewable through June 1, 2018. The project is led by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, in partnership with Smithsonian Affiliations.

Smithsonian Affiliate
23
Feb

Junior Astronomy Workshop

Friday, 7:30 - 9:30 PM
02/23/2018

LEARN MORE
24
Feb

Build + Blast! Model Rocket Workshop

Saturday 10 AM –3 PM
02/24/2018

LEARN MORE
28
Feb

Lunch + Learn: Gem + Mineral Identification

Wednesday, 12:15 PM
02/28/2018

LEARN MORE

Museum Hours

Every day 10 AM – 5 PM
Closed Major Holidays


Admission

Members: FREE
Adults: $15.95 + tax
Children (3 – 17): $11.95 + tax
Student with ID: $11.95 + tax
Active Military w/ ID: Free
(1/2 price admission for active
duty dependents with ID)
Seniors (65+): $13.95 + tax

*Rates effective July 1, 2017.

Location

100 Tellus Drive
Cartersville, GA 30120
(770) 606-5700
I-75 Exit 293
Cartersville, GA

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