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Contact Us

(770) 606-5700

Museum Hours

Every day 10 AM – 5 PM
Closed Major Holidays


Admission

Members: FREE
Adults: $15.95 + tax
Children (3 – 17): $11.95 + tax
Student with ID: $11.95 + tax
Active Military w/ ID: Free
(1/2 price admission for active
duty dependents with ID)
Seniors (65+): $13.95 + tax

Location

100 Tellus Drive
Cartersville, GA 30120
(770) 606-5700
I-75 Exit 293
Cartersville, GA
Mineral Symposium 2019 at Tellus Science Museum

Mineral Symposium 2019

Saturday, March 23, 2019
9 AM – 5 PM*

MEMBERS: $30 | NON-MEMBERS: $40

Prepaid reservations are required. Cost includes all presentations, breakfast and lunch, as well as Museum admission.

* Optional dinner add-on: $30. Dinner registration must be reserved by noon, Wednesday, March 20, 2019.

Join experts in the field to learn about the geology and minerals found at some of the outstanding mineral localities within the Southeast.

* This scientific mineral symposium is recommended for those with a geologic background and general mineral knowledge.

 * Speaker lineup subject to change without notice.

Graham Ensor – member of the British and Irish Meteorite Society

The Mystery of meteorites – Fabulous Falls and Fantastic Finds

With a focus on some of the more interesting and unusual background stories behind some historic finds and falls, including some currently on exhibit at Tellus, Graham will discuss the importance of collaboration between collectors, hunters, dealers, and researchers. His talk includes examples from his own collection and hunting expedition finds and work to have these items classified.

Dr. Julia Cartwright – University of Alabama

Making an impact: Investigating impacts in our early Solar System through meteorite analysis

The Solar System is a very active place – planets, asteroids and other planetary bodies will sometimes interact with one another, which can lead to meteor and impact events here on Earth! In this talk, Dr. Cartwright will describe some of the main concepts of meteor events and impacts, and then detail some of her research involving understanding impact events on other planetary bodies through the study of extra-terrestrial materials that originate from planet and asteroid surfaces.

R. Scott Harris – Fernbank Science Center

From Pampas to Altiplano: The Recent Impact Record of South America

The Miocene to Recent strata of the Argentine Pampas, Chilean Atacama, and Peruvian Altiplano contain a robust record of at least a dozen hypervelocity collisions between our planet and asteroids over the last ten million years, including the most recent crater-forming impact on Earth. The craters and ejecta formed during these events provide unique insights into the formation of impact melt glass, the geology of asteroid parent bodies, the recent flux of impactors at Earth, and perhaps some significant changes to life.

Alessondra Springmann – University of Arizona’s Lunar & Planetary Laboratory

Links between meteorites and asteroids, missions to near-Earth asteroids, and Arecibo Observatory

Short of sending spacecraft to an asteroid, the best way to learn about asteroids is to zap them with radar. Radar observations reveal a wide variety of asteroid shapes, surface features, and sizes, as well as asteroid moons.  Important not only for robotic solar system exploration of asteroids, radar-derived asteroid shape models help us plan space missions to asteroids. Alessondra will show recent results from the Arecibo Observatory planetary radar system – the world’s largest single-dish radio telescope and the most powerful planetary radar system for asteroid studies located in Puerto Rico – and discuss two current asteroid sample return missions to bring pieces of ancient asteroids to Earth, to understand how the Solar System formed, and to understand meteorites from asteroids that landed on Earth!

Steven Simon – Institute of Meteoritics at University of New Mexico

The Fall, Recovery, and Classification of the Park Forest Meteorite

On the night of March 26, 2003 a meteoroid entered the Earth’s atmosphere and broke up over the midwest. Pieces fell as meteorites in and around the village where Steve lived, Park Forest, IL, a southern suburb of Chicago. This became one of the most densely populated areas to ever experience a meteorite shower. This talk will be Steve’s first-hand account of his involvement in the recovery and characterization of the Park Forest meteorite. He will show what the pieces look like, where they fell, how the meteorite was classified, and give estimates of its orbit and pre-atmospheric size.

Dave Gheesling – Curator, Falling Rocks Collection, Co-founder of Meteorite Association of Georgia

Meteorite falls in Georgia and the Southeast

In a talk that will both entertain and inform, Dave will discuss stories related to Georgia meteorites exhibited in the Meteorite Headlines gallery, and will share further stories related to other Georgia meteorites.

27
Apr

Scout Saturday: Brownies

Saturday 9:45 AM – 12:30 PM
04/27/2019

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11
May

National Astronomy Day

Saturday, 1 PM - 11 PM
05/11/2019

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22
May

Lunch + Learn: What’s New in Science News?

Wednesday, 12:15 PM
05/22/2019

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MUSEUM HOURS

Every day 10 AM – 5 PM
Closed Major Holidays


ADMISSION

Members: FREE
Adults: $15.95 + tax
Children (3 – 17): $11.95 + tax
Student with ID: $11.95 + tax
Active Military w/ ID: Free
(1/2 price admission for active
duty dependents with ID)
Seniors (65+): $13.95 + tax

LOCATION

100 Tellus Drive
Cartersville, GA 30120
(770) 606-5700
I-75 Exit 293
Cartersville, GA

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